Fake
This is strictly a poorly
written fake job listing
Don't fall for it!
A box of rocks probably taught these guys how to write this scam-mail LOL. Here's another job scam that you might get from someone claiming to be Career Builder, but these guys don't claim to represent any company. They sent me multiple copies of this one, each with a different e-mail address at the same domain. The domain name is usaitcareer.com, so apparently they're trying to claim to be some sort of IT company, but the website is not active. They just receive e-mail at it. The "region" for the "job" is simply "United States," without mentioning any city or state.

They simply say "welcome to our hiring process" and then describe scheduling as an "occupation." There is no mention of which "job" it's supposed to be, other than in one other subject line that claims it's "database management." Business hours are also listed in "U.S. time," without mentioning any of the U.S.'s six different time zones, from Hawaii-Aleutian to Eastern. Finally, they claim there are no startup fees, but you would shortly get a fake cashiers check in the mail that would bounce higher than Venus.

For "this position," there are different position ID numbers attached to each e-mail address. As usual, these scammers are too lazy to write a convincing enough scam-mail to fool much of anyone.


This entry is linked here, and there are some job scam videos located here. Please follow me on Twitter @inscamerated. Thank You!


 
 
This is not from Interpol
"Hacking For
Dummies"
I wanted to blog this scam just because the English is so horrible. Don't help them though, let them figure it out on their own. It's a little different, because they're not actually asking for money - yet. They claim to have "arrested" three men who have supposedly scammed you out of a lot of money, and it sounds as if they'd like to return it to you out of the goodness of their hearts. They also ask that you not forward this scam-mail to anyone else, oh, like maybe the real Interpol LOL. This entry is linked here. Please follow me on Twitter @inscamerated. Thank You!


 
 
This scam-mail is not from the FBI
This persistent, scamming little butthead has a big ego and a lot of nerve. He's attempting to get what he wants through sheer intimidation. If we don't respond, he's threatening to have our bank accounts closed by our cities' mayors, and also to cause us to lose our jobs wherever we work. Of course, he has no idea where we live or work whatsoever, and his threats are meaningless.

Further "threats" continue afterward, such as jailing us for life and having our properties confiscated, then by trying to "shame" us because our families would supposely know that we are "wanted" by the FBI. If we would only comply and respond, all our "problems" can be "solved" with a $98 fee made through Western Union LOL. This entry is linked here, and there are some Nigerian 419 scam videos located here. Please follow me on Twitter @inscamerated. Thank You!


 
 
2012 London Olympics
Here's a freshly created scam that's been going around for a little while. Scammers always like to take advantage of major events, such as baseball's World Series or soccer's World Cup. The Olympics of whatever year is never an exception.

If you have ever wondered whether the money being offered by strangers is real, please allow me to alleviate the wonder. The answer is always a resounding "No!" If you had access to millions of dollars or pounds, would you want to give it away to someone else?


If you do not want to get ripped off, then please do not ever allow temptation to goad you into paying for something that simply does not exist. The one and only reason these people create these scams and send them out in the first place is because they are successful in stealing people's money. This has been going on for hundreds of years in one form or another, and the internet has made scamming extremely convenient. Stop falling for the scams, and the scammers and their e-mails will go away.


Today, the scammers always want you to wire them money, because once they pick it up, it is gone for good, and you would have virtually no chance of getting it back. Western Union or MoneyGram will warn you about the scam, but in the end, if they cannot convince you that it is one, they cannot refuse to take your wiring fee. Even if the police caught the scammers and got it back, it would not surprise me if they kept it for themselves or for the department.

P.T. Barnum said that there's a sucker born every minute. Opportunity may quietly knock just once, but temptation will loudly bang on your front door forevermore. Don't be a sucker. The money does not ever exist, and there are never any exceptions. Period.

This entry is located here, and there are some lottery scam videos here. Please follow me on Twitter @inscamerated. Thank you!


 
 
These social media scams have been going on for awhile now, and this is one of the few I've seen that claims to come from Facebook. Scammers have also misrepresented MySpace, Yahoo, Microsoft, Google, and a few others. I haven't seen a Twitter scam yet, for that matter.

Every single one of the e-mails you get that claim you've "won" millions of dollars are always scams, 100 percent of the time. There are never any exceptions to this rule, ever. Please do not be tempted by these scams, and never wire any cash to the scammers. If you already have, please stop right now.

The so-called "money" does not exist, it never did, and there is virtually no possible way you can get your money back. This entry is linked here, and there are some lottery scam videos located here. Please follow me on Twitter @inscamerated. Thank you.
 
 
PCH Prize Patrol
Sigh ... the Publishers Clearinghouse scammers are at it again, trying to convince you that you've "won" today's draw. Don't fall for this stuff. If you did win, PCH will never contact you by e-mail. They will either contact you by snail-mail, or they'll actually drop by your home. This entry is located here, in the upper right hand corner, and there are some lottery scam videos here. Please follow me on Twitter @inscamerated. Thank you!

 
 
Facebook Scams
Oh good, I've got another fresh scam that wasn't on my website. It's probably been going around for a little while, though. This one claims you've won the Facebook "Lottery." Just as with all corporations, some may be philanthropists. It depends upon how much extra cash they have. They may give money to charity, but they never give it away to individuals, especially not in the form of a lottery in which your e-mail address or mobile number was "chosen." These are always scams, and there are no exceptions, ever. This entry is located here, in the upper left hand corner, and there are some lottery scam videos here. Please follow me on Twitter @inscamerated. Thank You!

 
 
$1M Charity Check
Oprah gives more
money to charity
than anyone else
Okay, sure, on her show one time, Oprah Winfrey gave away some cars. Another time she gave away $1,000 to each of her audience members, but they had to donate the money to charities of their choice. Oprah's a well-known billionaire who gives away millions of dollars every year, but ordinarily not to individual people. This practice is known as philanthropy.

In order to "qualify" for David Moore's little million dollar "Oprah" scam, you need to fill out an "application." If you request details about his initial e-mail, and he sends it to you, there will still not be anything mentioned about the $285 "application fee." That part only comes at the bottom of the app.

Of course, if you send the money, you will never see the million, and your "fee" will be gone, too. This isn't the only scam that "David" has tried to pull, either, because the phone number is still the same in the others. Someone will catch up with him sooner or later. This entry is located here, in the upper right hand corner, and there are also four charity scam videos here. Please follow me on Twitter @inscamerated. Thank You!

 
 
No Job Scams!
No Job Scams!
This one is even funnier than yesterday's fake "Career Builder job." Is anyone really going to take this BS seriously? I sure hope not. "Susan Walters" with the free e-mail address says, "I am honored  to welcome you on behalf of our entity." In the third sentence, she refers to "our company." This "entity" or "company" has no name? ROFLMFAO. "Susan" claims to be in possession of my "CV" which I can only assume is a resume. "Wages" are to be paid every month, she says, but gives no denomination. 3,600 to 8,300 what per month? Dollars? Yen? Pounds? Her little scam-mail assures us that we would not have to pay anything at our own cost to get this "job." Gee, that would be nice -- if it was real to begin with. Rest assured, it's not. This entry is located here in the upper left hand corner, and there are some job scam videos here. Please follow me on Twitter @inscamerated. Thank you.

 
 
Career Builder.com
Here's another scam-mail from that's not from Career Builder. The only thing the scammer does to try and convince you it is, though, is in the subject line. The only company they mention is "our firm," it's from a free e-mail address, and they also expect you to reply to another free e-mail address. Don't fall for it; these so-called "job positions" are never real. This entry is located here, and there are some job scam videos here. Please follow me on Twitter @inscamerated. Thank you.

 


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    Author

    My name is Gary, and I live in the Midwestern United States. This site is intended to expose the frauds and scams that are so pervasive on the internet, especially today. One hundred per- cent of the e-mails you get that promise you millions are never, ever real. They'll tell you they're "dying," trying to gain your sympathy. They're not dying, they're lying. Click Here for the "Dying" scams. Don't fall for it, and never send them any money, no matter what they tell you. Oh, and good luck hacking this website. It's got a nice strong password on it.

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